Shakespeare: The Invention of the Human


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Bush as a fascist. All are present-day critical studies engaging multiple perspectives. Kerrigan p. Morse p. Schiller p. No other writer has had such universal influence, nor produced works so brilliant that they have transcended the theater and literature to such a magnitude. Bloom has taken an esoteric argument and perhaps made it less pedagogical and more accessible for the general reader. He is extravagant, extreme, and antagonistic, expressing himself in an overconfident and oftentimes arrogant manner, coming off, perhaps intentionally, as offensive and brutish.

This has angered many Shakespeare scholars. One could also get the impression that he is bringing Shakespeare a lot of attention only to further his eminence and fortune. Anti-Bloom critics may risk their own images by attacking Bloom.

According to William W. Instead of engaging in literary discourse, some such critics may be viewed as vying for their own dominion in academic discussions by being petty and clashing with one another. It minimizes the works of other brilliant authors and playwrights. Meh ,Bloom seems to live in a bubble outside the modern world. You can disagree with him but you'd better bring your A-game because he will be.

He forces you to specifically delineate to yourself why you think what you think.

Shakespeare: The Invention of the Human - Harold Bloom - Google книги

His passion for art is palpable, intoxicating. He assigns to it an extraordinary, spiritual place in the human condition. In his view Shakespeare is nothing less than the Moses of a new testament, using poetry and theatre to re-create us in his own image.

Bloom's mind, warped by his ego and intransigence is nonetheless exhilarating. If you love art, ideas, discussion, debate, etc. You'll be up all night arguing with this guy. Dec 04, Helena rated it really liked it Recommends it for: rosalind. It also holds a special place in my brainheart because Bloom is pretty much right on about everything he's saying in regards to Shahkespeare's invention of modern personality, and because he unabashedly plays favorites with the characters as though he knew them personally.

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The book reads like a long, deeply enjoyable uninterrupted conversation your irascible old genius grandfather. View 2 comments. Dec 19, Geoff marked it as to-read. Yes, I'm going to read Harold Bloom's book putting forth the preposterous notion that humanity didn't exist before Shakespeare. Haters gonna hate. What, jealous? Jan 01, Leonard Gaya rated it it was ok.

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I must humbly confess that I had to stop halfway this heavy slumber-driven brick-book. In the end, I am not totally sure whether or not Shakespeare did "invent the human" as the title grandiosely seems to claim. However, I am quite sure that, with a few lines, like those spoken by Holofernes in "Love's labour's lost", he did invent Harold Bloom.

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Feb 04, Matt rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: humans, and very mature chimpanzees. The subtitle deliberately goads anyone who came of age after to pull the Eurocentric card. And given the amount of time Bloom has spent of late on a personal crusade against the Harry Potter series, you almost wonder if Bloom has landed a few steps to the wrong side of the line between provocative and senile. It is puzzling to say the least that such a brilliant critic feels the need to officially weigh in -- vocally and repeatedly -- on an already critically agreed-upon observation about The subtitle deliberately goads anyone who came of age after to pull the Eurocentric card.

It is puzzling to say the least that such a brilliant critic feels the need to officially weigh in -- vocally and repeatedly -- on an already critically agreed-upon observation about the literary value of the Potter stories. Shouldn't you be writing more essays on Hamlet? Well, postcolonialists looking for a winning fight should go back to dusty old Conrad works. Bloom's leviathan is just too good. And you don't have to buy into the idea that Shakespeare was the progenitor of limning the human consciousness in literature to find ye some beauty and truth in Bloom's essays about the myriad and often quite surprising ways in which the Bard explores the underpinnings of homo sapiens sapiens.

In other words, you don't need to think Shakespeare was the first writer to perform an autopsy on the human soul to concede how successful he perfected the procedure. I consult this book in the same way that I consult a dictionary or other large reference one can't imagine functioning without. Jul 06, Dolors rated it really liked it Recommended to Dolors by: Helle.

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Harold Bloom’s Shakespeare: The Invention of the Human

Shelves: read-in A work in progress that will probably last several years, but I am quite enjoying Bloom's pompous, sometimes even overblown essays! Jan 25, John Porter rated it liked it. Glad it's on my shelf A big hunk of what Bloom is trying pass off as revelatory is more like a response to younger literary critics and their beliefs. And it's kind of charmingly ironic that Bloom attacks others for their blind devotion to narrow paradigms in a book where he spends a big glob of time psychologically fawning over Falstaff.

It's not really a book about Shakespeare; it's a book about what Harold Bloom wants us to know about Shakespeare a Glad it's on my shelf It's not really a book about Shakespeare; it's a book about what Harold Bloom wants us to know about Shakespeare and why he thinks we should know it. I'm surprised Stanley Fish didn't get to it first.

View 1 comment. Dec 26, Gustav Klimt rated it did not like it. I hate to call any book worthless, but I'm having a hard time thinking of anything of value in this narcissistic bore of a tome. Bloom has done absolutely no research on Early Modern culture, has no concept of the current scholarly discussion in Shakespeare studies, and his readings of the plays amount--basically--to platitudinous gut-reactions. Sure,he has his insights here and there, but the layperson that thinks this is in any way a great contribution to Shakespeare studies is being hoodwinke I hate to call any book worthless, but I'm having a hard time thinking of anything of value in this narcissistic bore of a tome.

Sure,he has his insights here and there, but the layperson that thinks this is in any way a great contribution to Shakespeare studies is being hoodwinked. Try to find a single citation for this book in any serious books or articles on Early Modern literature. Jan 14, drmglw rated it really liked it Shelves: non-fiction , thesis. Jul 16, vi macdonald rated it did not like it Shelves: 20th-century , reads , philosophy , the-shit-list , art-history-theory.

Holy crap. Where to even begin with Bloom? The guy is essentially a literary theory has-been who made his name by developing a style of literary criticism and theory based on Freudian principles and ideas that made him a big deal in the 80s but these days makes him seem like a massive joke. I'd be laughing if it wasn't so horrifyingly apparent that his plan worked - this has an average rating higher than 4 ugh , so I guess he managed to grab the public's attention somehow. Furthermore, two things: 1 What the hell was with this guy's attempt at defending the disgusting sexism in "The Taming Of The Shrew"?

His arguments are absolute nonsense! Sure, he wasn't perfect - but neither was Shakespeare, and that didn't stop him calling Shakespeare "secular scripture" in a book that literally hinges on the assertion that Shakespeare invented the English language which he did not, at least - not completely, anyway and human nature itself which he definitely did not. Mar 04, Ryan Creel rated it it was amazing. I've read this book a couple of times, and though my criticism of it has evolved over time, I still love it because, for me, it was the first book that made Shakespeare truly accessible.

Along the way to earning my English degree, I came across some legitimate criticisms of the author, most of which came from professors teaching theory classes, and they aren't without merit. For one, the fact that Professor Bloom cites nothing, seemingly wishing the reader to believe every notion in the text is I've read this book a couple of times, and though my criticism of it has evolved over time, I still love it because, for me, it was the first book that made Shakespeare truly accessible.

For one, the fact that Professor Bloom cites nothing, seemingly wishing the reader to believe every notion in the text is an original thought, is problematic. He's too conservative for some, and when it comes to women, he's not exactly the most progressive of critics. That said, this was an amazing read, and the man is extraordinarily insightful and persuasive.

Bloom sheds ample light on the originality of Shakespeare, and does a wonderful job at showing the reader just how influential his works have been on the western canon. If you love Shakespeare, chances are that Harold Bloom will offer something in this book that will enhance that feeling.

Harold Bloom Interview on Writers & Company - CBC Radio

Apr 10, Dan added it Shelves: american-north-lit , kessays. The Boston Globe put it accurately: "For all its huge ambition, this book will probably prove most useful as a companion to the plays [and:] may find its longest shelf life in the homes of theatergoers who crave a literate friend who's still awake to chew things over with.

Sep 21, Carol Storm rated it really liked it. All 37 essays are exciting and fun to read. Jul 18, Timothy Koh rated it it was ok Recommends it for: no one. Bloom is a bit of a funky character to me and I approached this book with plenty of excitement but also plenty of caution. A full pager with 4 essays and one essay per Shakespeare play sounded too good to resist, and I made a purchase in hopes of learning something new.

Alas, in this front, I was very much mistaken.

Shakespeare: The Invention of the Human Shakespeare: The Invention of the Human
Shakespeare: The Invention of the Human Shakespeare: The Invention of the Human
Shakespeare: The Invention of the Human Shakespeare: The Invention of the Human
Shakespeare: The Invention of the Human Shakespeare: The Invention of the Human
Shakespeare: The Invention of the Human Shakespeare: The Invention of the Human

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